Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

Case Study 8 Terry

Last updated: 02 September 2021

Terry Chapman

“I cannot recommend getting involved in research enough. Not only does it benefit you, but also other patients. Members of my family have been so impressed with the treatment I have received at PHU and, have said they would give their right arm to be involved in research!”

An accidental fall while on a cruise holiday to Australia in 2018, led to Terry Chapman being seen by a cardiologist in Sydney where he was diagnosed with a serious heart condition. On his return Terry was quickly referred to the cardiology team here at PHU.

During his first cardiology appointment, Terry was also diagnosed with an iron deficiency and was invited to join the IronMan research study, led by Prof Paul Kalra – and he hasn’t looked back since. The study looks at whether iron supplement injections can ease the life-limiting symptoms of heart failure. Funded by the British Heart Foundation, the study is determining if iron supplements can reduce hospitalisation in heart failure patients, and improve their ability to exercise without becoming breathless and fatigued.

As part of the trial, Terry visits the cardiology research team regularly, where he has been advised that if he ever had any concerns to contact the team immediately.

“The care I have received has been second to none. One of the benefits of taking part in the IronMan study has enabled me to receive treatment really quickly – it’s been incredible.” 

Keen to help out with further research, Terry also took part in the SYMPACT study. The study is looking at gaining a better understanding of the symptoms that patients with heart failure experience and, whether they influence the self-management of their condition.

Terry meets with the cardiology research fellow Dr. Elena Cowan, every four months for a full assessment of his health where any concerns are addressed quickly. One visit saw Terry being treated for a skin condition and referred to the dermatology team the following day and treated.

Terry added: “I’m amazed at how quickly I get seen and cared for as a result of being part of this study. I hadn’t appreciated how one condition can impact another, but they are always addressed and sorted so quickly.”

More recently, Terry arrived in the outpatient clinic where the research nurses, Lili Lopes and Serena Howe quickly recognised, he was having a heart attack and admitted him to the coronary care unit immediately. Now fitted with a pacemaker, Terry is home and thankful for the care he has received.

“I cannot recommend getting involved in research enough. Not only does it benefit you, but also other patients. Members of my family have been so impressed with the treatment I have received at PHU and, have said they would give their right arm to be involved in research!”

If you would like to get involved in research, PHU has a dedicated team who will be delighted to help with enquiries. Please email: research.office@porthosp.nhs.uk

 

 

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