Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Nurse-led clinic at PHU successfully linked with fewer re-admissions and improved survival for patients with liver disease

Date: 09 September 2021

Nurse led clinic   1

Established in 2018, a nurse-led clinic at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust (PHU), which supports patients discharged from hospital with advanced liver disease, has been successfully linked with a significant reduction in emergency readmissions to hospital and, an improvement in survival.

 

Dr Richard Aspinall, clinical lead for hepatology, said: “Patients admitted to hospital with liver disease are known to have high rates of emergency readmission after discharge. These readmissions are most commonly due to factors such as a build-up of abdominal fluid, confusion due to an increase in excess toxins, or through ongoing alcohol dependency.

 

“Although these problems can be effectively treated, patients are often readmitted to hospital while awaiting clinic appointments with consultants. To combat this, we designed and set up a dedicated early post-discharge clinic led by specialist nurses. To ensure patients are receiving effective treatment for their cirrhosis, they attend the clinic within the first two weeks of going home after being discharged.”

 

Dr Ben Giles, hepatology research fellow, studied the outcomes for patients attending the nurse-led clinic. Prior to the implementation of the clinic, around 30% to 40% of patients with liver disease could be readmitted to hospital, however, following the set-up of the clinic, findings have shown that patient readmissions have been reduced to 12%. The nurse led clinic works with patients to provide clinical and emotional support to improve their health and manage the symptoms of liver disease, including nutritional advice, overcoming alcohol misuse, and optimising their medications.

 

Karen Gamble, hepatology clinical nurse specialist, said: “It is a real privilege to work alongside patients with liver disease in this dedicated nurse led clinic, empowering individuals to make changes that will improve their overall wellbeing, while helping to manage the symptoms of liver disease that can make life uncomfortable at times.”

 

Stephen Peacock from Portsmouth, has been receiving treatment for decompensated liver cirrhosis at Queen Alexandra Hospital and was once a frequent inpatient. After referral to the dedicated early post-discharge clinic, Stephen has not required any further inpatient care. More recently, Stephen was referred to consultant radiologist Dr Christopher Ball for a new radiology procedure known as TIPS (Transjugular Intra Hepatic Shunt), a specialist radiology procedure to reduce high liver blood pressure, due to chronic liver disease.

 

Christopher, said: “Prior to the TIPS procedure being undertaken at PHU, patients would have been required to travel to Southampton or as far as London for the treatment. Being able to perform this procedure here at PHU means we can provide complete care for both acutely and chronically unwell patients with liver disease and help reduce the number of hospital visits.

 

Stephen added: “I used to work for a food and drink wholesaler where unfortunately alcohol was really cheap, and I paid the price. With the help of the amazing nurses in the liver clinic I have been able to stay out of hospital, but also due to the shunt, I have reduced the number of times I have to attend the clinic. I cannot thank the nurses and team at QA enough – they have been an amazing support to me.”

 

ENDS

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