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Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

National ODP Day: a note from Sarah Wadham

Date: 14 May 2020

Time: 07:00

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National ODP Day: a note from Sarah Wadham

Thursday 14 May

Today is National Operating Department Practitioner (ODP) Day and although we are unable to celebrate the profession the way we had planned, the ODP Team wanted to have some form of celebration to get the message out there about what we do and hopefully inspire the next generation of ODPs.

What I am about to write will not do the role of an ODP justice, but I will give you a small insight in to my profession and hopefully spark your curiosity to find out more.

I have been an ODP for the last five years, I truly love my job and I could not see myself doing anything else.

I work alongside the anaesthetist to help make the process smooth and calm for the patient, and the department. A key and very important part of my role is to reassure the patient and be their advocate to make sure they feel safe, secure and listened to. I am looking after them at their most vulnerable and I will help to alleviate any worries they may have.  

My daily role will see me firstly making a cup of tea (very important) while I am setting up for the day’s list, because you never know when your next patient is coming. I check the anaesthetic machine, preparing the relevant equipment such as medication, endotracheal tubes, laryngoscopes and so much more. I also have to prepare specialist equipment for the more tricky airway management. 

After our morning team brief, we collect our first patient for the day. I go through all the necessary checks and then get ready for general anaesthetic to begin.

I monitor the patient’s vital signs while always watching the patient, I pass equipment and assist the anaesthetist with any difficulties that may occur. While the Theatre Team does their bit, I prepare for the extubation before taking the patient to recovery.

At the end of the day, it’s a team effort to clean, tidy and stock up ready for the following day.

ODPs cover all specialities from emergencies, trauma, bariatric, gynaecology, urology, breast and plastic and maternity. My role can be very varied, as I also cover other areas of the hospital that require our service and skills such as interventional radiology, cardiac, endoscopy, MRI and support emergencies in the Emergency Department. 

You can find ODPs working across the Trust, in places such as education, simulation, Quality Improvement and resuscitation. I am also currently associated with the Resuscitation Team as I provide Basic Life Support Training to other colleagues from Health Care Assistants up to consultant level. This extra role that I provide is fun, educational and it means that I get to converse with all members of the Trust. 

Many ODPs will have a link role, meaning they will be responsible for specific equipment, specialities or areas in the department. This requires them to communicate with other areas of the hospital, and also manufacturers. My own link role is in pharmacy, I have to stay in touch with the department to be updated of issues, changes, deliveries, stock, saving money and safety. I really enjoy this role, which can be challenging at times.

Many aspects of how we work in our department has changed over the past weeks and months as we make our way through these unusual times to deal with Covid-19.

We rely on each other as a team, carefully listening to one another, being very clear and precise and supporting one another through these challenging times.

Covid-19 has sent me to work in areas that I am not familiar with, which has been challenging but also incredible. I have been taught new skills by other profession and shared my own skills and knowledge.

From a professional development point of view, I have expanded my mind, knowledge and skills, as well as think about what we can learn for the future.  

 

Covid-19 will undoubtedly make not only ODPs but all NHS professionals better and stronger; we will continue to do what we do best because we love our jobs.

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