Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Maria Moon shares her experience of working on the hospital wards during the COVID-19 pandemic

Date: 03 July 2020

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Maria Moon, Specialist Research Nurse at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, is just one of the many individuals who sacrificed family life in order to work on the front line during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maria experienced COVID-19 symptoms back in March, before any swabbing or antibody tests were available. She was lucky enough to own a flat locally, which had recently been refurbished and was vacant, where she could stay to self-isolate away from her husband Chris and their two daughters, Sofia, aged 9 and Isabel, aged 6.

She isolated for 10 days before returning to work, but made the difficult decision not to return to her home and family while working on the COVID wards, as Chris is immuno-suppressed and at a higher risk from the virus. Maria was separated from her family for 10 weeks in total.

Maria commented: “This was at a time early on where we didn’t really know what to expect and how bad things were going to be. We were looking at the reports from Italy and preparing for the worst. My whole team were being redeployed and undertaking training so that we could work on the COVID wards, so staying away from my family just meant that I did not have to worry about them and I could throw myself into work knowing that they were safe.

“I was just one of many people in the same boat at that time and we tried to make the most of it as a family and have fun where we could. We did a lot of cooking on FaceTime, Chris did sleepovers in the lounge and I’d drop the grocery shopping off after work and wave to the girls through the window. It was hard to coordinate things at times but I know there were a lot of people far worse off than us.”

As a Research Nurse, Maria was instrumental to signing patients up to the RECOVERY trial. The RECOVERY trial is a nationwide trial comparing four different drugs for the treatment of patients with COVID-19. The trial was classed as an urgent public health research study and all NHS Trusts in England were asked to support it. The trial has shown one of the trial drugs, Dexamethasone, to be the first treatment proven to reduce mortality in COVID-19 worldwide. It reduced deaths by one third in ventilated patients and by one fifth in patients requiring oxygen.

Maria said: “Being part of the RECOVERY trial was an awesome experience as we were incorporating research to help people first hand and driving forward their treatments. The research team have such a wealth of experience and additional expertise gained from working on trials, but working directly with doctors and surgeons at the top of their game was an incredibly enriching experience.

“It was often quite challenging getting people to take part in the trial as they were very ill when they were admitted and too exhausted to absorb all the of the trial information. However the whole hospital pulled together and I am incredibly proud of being part of the RECOVERY trial team and PHT as a whole.”

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