Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Love Island star helps more people to seek help early after cancer treatment at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust

Date: 27 June 2022

Demi Jones and Costa

More people are coming forward for head and neck cancer diagnostic tests in Portsmouth – thanks in part to a local celebrity who has openly shared about her own experience with cancer.

Demi Jones, who was a contestant on ITV’s popular Love Island show in 2020, has spoken publicly about her battle with thyroid cancer. She was diagnosed in May 2021 and received treatment at the Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, before declaring at the end of the year she was cancer free.

Demi said: “I’m thrilled to see an increase in the number of people getting tested for head and neck cancers since I’ve openly shared my personal story, it really highlights the impact of social media and how important it is to talk. Although it’s a horrible thing to go through, I’m so pleased to have helped people and continue to encourage, especially young people, to get checked and potentially save lives!”

In May 2021, when Demi was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, there were 372 people referred to Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust for tests on suspected head and neck cancers, of these six people were later diagnosed with thyroid cancer.

A year later in May 2022, there were 491 referrals to the Trust for suspected head and neck cancers, with one person later diagnosed with thyroid cancer.

Matthew Ward, Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Lead at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust, said: “It’s fantastic that Demi has been so upfront in the media about her cancer diagnosis and treatment. I have certainly seen a number of patients in recent months who have come to see us in the ENT department because they have read about Demi’s journey.

“Thyroid cancer can affect very young patients, and so it is important that people do see a specialist if they are worried.”

 

The Queen Alexandra Hospital has a large thyroid practise in the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) department, with three specialist ENT thyroid surgeons who treat everyone with thyroid lumps. Typically, patients get referred by their GP having noticed a lump in their neck. They are then assessed in the clinic, using an ultrasound scan and a blood test.

Consultant Matthew Ward continued: “Thankfully, most of the thyroid lumps we see are not cancerous, and once we have the scan results, we can reassure the majority of patients that they don’t need any further treatment.

“If we do have any concerns on the scan, then we would proceed to take a needle biopsy which helps guide us what to do next. If the needle biopsy is worrying, then usually we proceed with thyroid surgery. If this confirms cancer, then further treatments are sometimes needed, depending on a number of factors. Thankfully, the vast majority of thyroid cancers respond very well to treatment, and most of our patients will be cured of their cancer.

“As with any cancer, the earlier we catch thyroid cancers then the easier they are to treat.”

 

What are the early signs and symptoms of thyroid cancer?

The main symptoms in the vast majority of cancers is a lump in the neck, which is usually at the front of the neck near the Adam’s Apple. Very occasionally, thyroid cancer can present with lump in the side of the neck.

Any patient who has a new lump in the neck that stays for longer than two to three weeks should be seen by an appropriately trained surgeon and assessed further. In our department, we treat both thyroid cancers, but also cancers in the neck that have spread from other parts of the body. We can therefore offer a full assessment of any neck lump.

Matthew added: “If people are worried about a lump, then they should see their GP in the first instance and then be referred to an appropriately trained specialist. Thankfully most lumps turn out to be benign, and most of the time we can reassure patients that all is well.”

For further information visit: nhs.uk

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