Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

#KnowWhereToGo for urgent medical help

Date: 15 June 2022

KnowWhereToGo

With temperatures heating up for Portsmouth of the next few days, we would like people to enjoy the sun safely and #KnowWhereToGo for medical advice and support.

Beautiful sunny weather is something many people look forward to and go out and enjoy. But it’s worth remembering that sunny spells can pose health risks for some people. It’s important to protect yourself and others from too much sun or heat, to carry water when travelling and to think of those, such as young children or older people, who may feel the heat more than others.

If you are spending time outdoors remember to take water or other hydrating drinks with you and protect yourself from the sun during the hottest hours of the day, usually between 11:00-15:00.

For some people, especially older people and those with underlying health conditions, the summer heat can bring real health risks. Temperatures indoors can be higher than temperatures outdoors. That’s why we’re urging everyone to keep an eye on those you know who may be at risk this summer. If you’re able, ask if your friends, family or neighbours need any support.

 

Our top tips:

  • Close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors.
  • Use cool spaces if going outdoors
  • Drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol
  • Never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle, especially infants, young children, vulnerable adults, or animals
  • Try to keep out of the sun between 11am to 3pm, when the UV rays are strongest
  • If you have to go outside in the heat, walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Avoid physical exertion during the hottest parts of the day
  • Make sure you take water with you if you are travelling
  • During warm weather, going for a swim can provide much welcomed relief. If you are going into open water to cool-down, take care and follow local safety advice.

 

Know Where To Go:

If you are feeling unwell from the heat you can:

  • Move to a cool place
  • Lie down and raise your feet slightly
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Cool your skin by spraying or sponging it with cold water

 

Contact NHS 111 for advice if:

  • You have sunburn over a large area
  • Your skin is blistering or swelling
  • You have chills or a high temperature of 38C or above (37.5C in children under five years)
  • You feel dizzy, have a headache and feel sick.

 

Please go to A&E or call 999 if:

  • You are not sweating even if you feel hot
  • Your temperature is 40C or above
  • You have fast breathing or shortness of breath
  • You feel confused
  • You have a fit (seizure), loss of consciousness or not responsive.

 

If you are not sure what help you need contact NHS 111 online or call your GP surgery (in hours).

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Queen Alexandra Hospital,
Cosham,
Portsmouth,
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