Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Introduction of new care pathway allows heart failure patients at Queen Alexandra Hospital to receive expert and timely care

Date: 23 February 2021

Lewis Tee and family 003

To ensure patients suffering from heart failure continue to receive expert care during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new service has been set up by the Cardiology Team at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust (PHU).

With there being many changes to the way patient care is delivered, in order to keep patients and colleagues safe, the Cardiology Team wanted to ensure their patients felt supported and had access to specialist care at a time when they may have felt worried or isolated.

With this in mind, consultants from the Cardiology Department Professor Paul Kalra, Dr Geraint Morton, Dr Kaushik Guha along with Mark Green, Heart Failure Nurse Specialist, set up an Ambulatory Clinic with the goal of supporting high risk patients, preventing admissions, plus improving quality of life and prognosis.

One particular patient who has seen the benefits is father-of-two, Lewis Tee, from Portsmouth who was diagnosed with heart failure at the age of just 34.

It was Christmas Eve and Lewis, along with his three-year-old daughter Lylah, was finishing up the preparations for the following day. They had just settled down for the evening and ordered a pizza when Lewis began to feel a sharp pain in his chest. “It felt like heart burn,” explains Lewis. “But the pain got sharper and sharper. It felt like I was being crushed, and then I just fell to the floor.”

Lewis’s wife, Jessica, quickly called for an ambulance who took him to Queen Alexandra Hospital. It was at the hospital where they could see Lewis had an abnormal heart rhythm and decided to admit him to hospital for further tests.

“I couldn’t believe it. It was Christmas Eve and I was being admitted to hospital,” says Lewis. “I just wanted to be at home with my family but instead I would go on to spend the next eight days in hospital undergoing numerous tests.”

Following an MRI scan at Southampton General Hospital, it was discovered that Lewis had severe scarring on his heart and a decision was made to fit an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to his heart.

With no previous symptoms, this came as quite a shock to Lewis. Life will now look different for the family, but they say each day is a blessing thanks to Professor Kalra and his team.

Lewis notes: “My life has completely changed. I haven’t been back to work and even the little things like playing with my two daughters I struggle to do.

“I am taking each day as it comes and give my thanks to the unbelievable team over at QA. They have literally saved my life – if I could, I would give them all a medal for what they do. No matter what, they are always there and just a phone call away.”

Just a few months after its introduction in April last year, the Ambulatory Clinic has been able to prevent hospital admissions for 87 per cent of its patients, with only six admitted directly to a cardiology ward to avoid the Emergency Department.

Mark Green, Heart Failure Nurse Specialist, adds: “The aim was to make sure that patients with a diagnosis of heart failure felt fully supported during the pandemic and that they knew they had someone that they could contact if they needed any help.

“The Ambulatory Clinic continues to allow us to do this, with Lewis’s story being a prime example.”

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