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Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Cervical Screening Awareness Week: Claire’s story

Date: 19 June 2020

Claire's story

This week we have been sharing information on the importance of cervical screening and the impact it can have on a person’s life, as part of Cervical Screening Awareness Week.

One woman who recognises how important these tests are is Claire Birks, who in January 2019 attended her fourth routine smear test (the previous three had all been negative) and thought nothing of it until she received a letter shortly after. The letter said that Claire’s results had found severe-moderate pre-cancerous cell changes.

Claire said, “When the letter arrived I was not expecting it at all and panicked initially.” A few weeks later Claire underwent a colposcopy and biopsy to investigate further and had her first diagnosis of pre-cancerous cell changes confirmed. She had these cells removed and a follow-up appointment booked for six months later as these particular cells are slow growing.

When she returned, Claire was shocked to find out the cells had grown back and were now HPV positive, meaning her chance of developing cervical cancer had increased. Claire then underwent another procedure and as a newlywed was advised to wait six months for her body to heal before trying for a baby.

In December 2019, Claire found out that she was pregnant and was referred by her community midwife at Fareham Community Hospital to the QA Hospital pre-term clinic. This was because the procedures Claire had gone under to treat the abnormal cells put her at increased risk of miscarriage and pre-term labour.

Claire was seen quickly by the team and said, “I felt really reassured that I was being so looked after and can't fault the team at QA. Every time I went to clinic they were prompt, professional and reassuring. As a bonus, I even got to see the baby on an ultrasound each time I visited as part of my monitoring, which gave me additional reassurance along the way that all was well.”

Claire was discharged from the clinic when she reached 26 weeks and she and her husband are expecting their first baby in August. She has since seen the consultant who carried out the procedures on her and he is happy with her progress. Claire will attend another follow-up at the end of the year.

When asked what message she would like to share with others who have a smear test coming up, Claire said, “Please don't be afraid of them! They might be a tiny bit uncomfortable, but they only last a minute or two. Even with what is going on at the moment with Covid-19, they are still important so if you get an invitation in the post, please attend.

“I am so glad I kept up with my routine appointments because it's easy to take them for granted and presume you'll be fine - you just never know what life has in store for you. I am now a year and a half on from my original diagnosis and looking forward to family life. If I hadn't gone, I'd be telling a very different story now.”

To find out more about having a smear test, please click here.

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