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Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Temporary visiting restrictions due to COVID-19

We recently made the difficult decision to suspend visiting to our hospital until further notice except in the below exceptional circumstances, to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Read more information about restrictions…


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

News

Celebrating Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) at PHT: Dietitians

Date: 29 May 2020

AHP - Rosie

Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) are the third largest group of individuals at the Trust. Our dedicated AHPs are able to support patients through birth to palliative care. They assess, treat and diagnose patients and support with prevention and improvement of health to enable people to live their lives to the full.

Earlier this year we launched a campaign to raise awareness about the roles AHPs carry out so as part of Dietitians Week (1 to 5 June) we are focusing on one of our fantastic Dietitians.

To read more about AHPs, please look at our first case study here.

Dietitians are health professionals that assess, diagnose and treat dietary and nutritional problems, as well as supporting people to make the right lifestyle and food choices. They are important members of the team and are involved in supporting a wide range of conditions including diabetes, eating disorders and food allergies.

Rosie King, a Dietitian with the Upper GI Surgical team at Queen Alexandra Hospital works with patients on the oesophago-gastric cancer pathway. Rosie has been a Dietitian for the last eight years covering a variety of specialist nutrition support roles including Macmillan supported posts within head and neck cancer teams as well as intestinal failure. She trained at the University of Plymouth and graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Nutrition and Dietetics after a three years course, which included clinical placements across NHS Trusts.

Rosie said, “I love food, science and working with people so dietetics combines the three brilliantly! In my role I particularly follow patients through pre-operative treatment, and support them throughout their recovery. This requires a lot of working with colleagues at the hospital (Surgeons, Oncologists, Gastroenterologists, Cancer and Nutrition Specialist Nurses and Pharmacists), as well as colleagues in neighbouring Trusts.”

The Covid-19 pandemic has meant adapting the way many of us work and Dietitians are no different. Rosie said as a team they have had to think efficiently and proactively to organise contingencies for the service including upskilling colleagues to cover growing intensive care areas and increased demand for enteral feeding (the administration of feed and/or fluid though a tube directly into the gastrointestinal tract). Rosie says that this was a massive joint effort across the whole team.

She added, “Moving forwards through the pandemic, I have maintained my outpatient caseload despite stopping face to face contact with patients; all my outpatient clinics have been replaced with telephone consultations and we are planning to move towards video consultations in the near future!”

When it comes to what the average day is like, Rosie said, “A small percentage of my caseload each week are inpatients following surgery;  I spend time on the surgical wards reviewing and counselling post-operative patients; initially many patients are fully tube fed and slowly progressed to diet as they recover on the ward. I liaise closely with their partners/carers when advising on diet for safe discharge home.”

The majority of her clinical time is spent off the ward working in surgical outpatients and joint clinics with nurses helping support patients at various phases of treatment. Rosie attends team meetings, participates in ward rounds and reviews outpatients using telephone consultations. As the deputy acute team lead, Rosie also has line management responsibilities for colleagues across the hospital.

If you’re interested in finding out about a career in Dietetics at PHT, please visit our website.

#AHPsAtPHT

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