Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

Whaling

Last updated: 20 January 2021

What has Whaling got to do with the Trust?

Whaling is a form of highly targeted phishing attacks (masquerading as a legitimate emails) that are aimed at executives or try to impersonate senior staff. Criminals looking to defraud organisations recognise that they can earn more by attacking at the top of organisation tree, because these individuals can arrange the transfer of a large amount of money.

A key thing to note about whaling compared to phishing is the attacks are often hand crafted. They will contain:

  • personalised information about the targeted organisation or individual. This is often gathered from social media and web sites.
  • convey a sense of urgency, often to get a more junior member of staff to break best practise “in an emergency”
  • are crafted with a solid understanding of business language and tone

The aim is to either infect the user’s machine or get funds transferred.

 

What do these sort of attacks look like?

 The first thing a fraudster does is try and build up a sense of rapport with the victim and lead them into the sting.

  1. The e-mail or text may start innocuously with “are you available?”, or “can you grab me something quickly?” or “if we do this, will there be any charges?”
  2. The mail or text might say they are stuck in meetings all day so can’t be contacted by their normal number.
  3. There may be many exchanges before they build up to ask what they really want.
  4. A new trick is where the fraudster follows up an e-mail or text with a phone call claiming to be with a company the trust deals with. When people talk to a real person they tend to drop their guard.

 

What’s the best way to combat one of these whaling attacks?

Check the e-mail address carefully

The e-mail address is hard for the fraudster to fake. Sometimes they will be obvious such as Gmail or Hotmail accounts and not the normal business email addresses.

However sometimes they can be a bit more subtle. For example, if you deal with

barry.worthy@trusthealthsupplies.co.uk, would you notice that barry.worthy@tursthealthsupplies.co.uk is a completely different address?

 

Ask yourself "is what I am being asked to do by the person out of character or against the normal procedures?"

Are you being asked to use unusual payment types or methods, or give out confidential information. going against best practise is a key indicator.

Verify that all important e-mail requests are verified by another method

Use a previously known phone number not the ones in the e-mail or text.

Limit the information you give on social media.

Fraudsters can build up a very convincing impression of you, based on a few key facts.

 

Back to top
Working together to drive excellence in care for our patients and communities Page feedback Tell us what you think

Get in touch

Queen Alexandra Hospital,
Cosham,
Portsmouth,
PO6 3LY

© 2021, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust