Current visiting times

We know how important it is for patients and families to be able to see visitors. Please help us keep our patients and staff as safe as possible by checking the guidance below before you visiting. 

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Voluntary Services team can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Our Strategy – Working Together, Improving Together

Our strategy sets out our vision, values, strategic aims and most importantly, how we will deliver against these ambitions for our patients, communities, and people in the future.

It is not just a document, it is for and about everyone at PHU, building on what we have achieved with a renewed focus on continuous improvement and the need to continue to work together and improve together to achieve our goals. 

A full copy of the strategy can be downloaded here.

For more information, please visit our strategy webpage.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

What is Breast Screening?

Last updated: 17 July 2023

Anyone can get breast cancer. It's the most common type of cancer in the UK.

The chance of getting breast cancer increases as you get older. Most breast cancers are diagnosed in women over 50 years old. The National Breast Screening Programme is an early detection service for breast cancer. Regular breast screening can find breast cancer before you notice any signs or symptoms. The programme is very successful and currently saves around 1,300 lives per year.

Breast screening is a well-woman service. If you have any breast symptoms or concerns you should contact your GP for the correct advice.

Breast screening uses X-rays called mammograms to check your breasts for signs of cancer. It's carried out by health specialists called mammographers. Early detection may often mean simpler and more successful treatment.

Portsmouth Breast Screening Programme has a screening population of around 85,000, living in the area from Petersfield to the north, Emsworth to the east, Locks Heath to the west and southerly to Portsea Island and the coast

Anyone registered with a GP as female will be invited for NHS breast screening every 3 years between the ages of 50 and 71. You'll get a letter in the post inviting you for your first invite between the ages of 50 and 53. Then you'll be invited every 3 years until you turn 71. Women over the age of 71 are not automatically invited to attend screening, however, they are welcome to contact us and self-refer themselves every 3 years.

Breast Screening is carried out at multiple locations. Most of screening is performed on a Mobile Screening Unit or Community Diagnostic Clinic. Second stage screening and any subsequent treatment is carried out at the Static Screening Unit, Breast Services Department, D Level, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham

Some people have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. ‘High Risk’ means that you have been assessed by a specialist in genetics or oncology as being at more risk of developing breast cancer than women in the general population. People at high risk of breast cancer are offered breast screening at an earlier age than others in the general population. We call this ‘surveillance’ screening. Please see the below link for more information about how we offer breast screening for women at high risk of developing breast cancer:

NHS Advice: Breast screening for women with a high risk of breast cancer

All mammograms are examined by at least two different film readers and a final result established. Results are sent out within two weeks of the original mammogram. Your GP is also informed of the result. If you would like to receive your results by email, please email your request to the Screening Office on bsu.admin@porthosp.nhs.uk

There are three possible results at this stage:

  • Normal- no abnormalities were seen, and you will be routinely recalled in three years, provided you will be under 71.
  • Second Stage Screening- The film readers have seen an area of concern or change in your mammograms, and they would like to perform some more tests. You will be invited to go to Breast Services Department, D level, Queen Alexandra Hospital for these tests within three weeks of your original mammogram. This does not necessarily mean you have cancer.
  • Technical Recall- for technical reasons some images need to be repeated before a final result can be established. You will be asked to return to a suitable mammography unit for the images to be repeated. They will then be re-examined in the normal manner.

If you have not received your result and you feel you should have then please contact the Screening Office on 023 9228 3613/3614

Alternatively, you can email us on bsu.admin@porthosp.nhs.uk

Head back to Breast Screening homepage

Back to top
Working together to drive excellence in care for our patients and communities Page feedback Tell us what you think

Get in touch

Queen Alexandra Hospital,
Cosham,
Portsmouth,
PO6 3LY

  • 023 9228 6000

© 2024, Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust