Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

Current visiting times

After suspending visiting earlier in the year, we are now able to offer limited visiting to some wards at the discretion of the nurse in-charge.”

Read more on visiting times...


Messages for loved ones and keeping in touch

We recognise the impact that a long stay in hospital can have on families and the importance of maintaining strong communication.  Our ward staff are keeping in touch with patients’ next of kin directly and our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) can help pass on personal messages from family and friends.

Read more information about messages for loved ones…

During your stay in hospital you will meet a number of different members of staff.  All members of staff wear name badges, but if you are not sure who someone is or what they do, please feel free to ask them to introduce themselves and explain what they do. 

If you have any questions about your treatment, please ask a doctor or a nurse.

There are lots of opportunities for you to get involved with the Trust, from volunteering to attending our public meetings, our Annual General Meeting or our hospital open day which is held every year.

Maternity Services

Last updated: 27 August 2020

B level

To view the latest visiting guidance for the maternity department, including attending scans and appointments, please click here

Women can self refer by completing the maternity self referral form.

Visit the Maternity Services Site for more information

Services include:

  • Antenatal care
  • Postnatal care
  • Labour and birth care
  • Maternity theatres
  • Infant Feeding support
  • Parent education

The Multiple Birth Team won the Working as One Team award and the Quality Improvement Award at the 2019 Nursing and Midwifery Awards.

I’m pregnant what do I need to do

Congratulations. We hope that you find the following information helpful.

Once you are pregnant and this has been confirmed by a positive pregnancy test, you can self refer to our service for care. Please complete the maternity self referral form and send it to the relevant email address. You do not have to see your GP first.

Screening tests for you and your baby.

Screening tests are used to find people at a higher chance of a health condition. Whether or not to have each test is a personal choice that only the individual invited for screening can make.

We offer all pregnant women screening tests during pregnancy to look for certain health conditions that could harm them or their baby.

Please click on the link for information on the screening tests that will be offered to you. You can discuss them further when the midwife contacts you to discuss your booking with the maternity service.

If you would like further information, please see the Antenatal results and Choices website.

Help while pregnant 

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, low birthweight, premature births and small poorly babies.

To give up smoking if you are a Hampshire resident, contact Smokefree Hampshire on 01264 563039 or email smokefree.hampshire@nhs.net.

Portsmouth residents can contact contact Portsmouth Wellbeing service on 023 9229 4001 or email wellbeing@portsmouthcc.gov.uk

 

Advice about alcohol in pregnancy can get confusing – the simplest line is to not drink while you’re pregnant. Alcohol passes from the mother’s blood across the placenta to the developing baby. Alcohol in the baby’s blood can interfere with his or her oxygen and nutrient supply, leading to birth defects, reduced growth and long-term learning and behaviour problems

Stillbirths are also more common in women who drink heavily. Drinking alcohol at critical times in the baby’s development, heavy (‘binge’) drinking and frequent drinking increase the likelihood that the baby will be affected

The safest way to ensure your baby is not damaged by alcohol is to not drink while you’re pregnant. If you are finding it hard to stop drinking, ask for help from your midwife or GP. They will be able to refer you for special support

 

Vitamins and supplements

Start taking folic acid and vitamin D supplements. Folic acid needs to be taken for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.

You need to take at least 400 micrograms of folic acid, but if the below applies you will need to take 5mg of folic acid which you can get on prescription from your GP:

  • your BMI is above 30
  • you or the baby's biological father have a neural tube defect
  • you or the baby's biological father have a family history of neural tube defects
  • you have had a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect
  • you have diabetes
  • you take anti-epilepsy medicine
  • you take anti-retroviral medicine for HIV

You need to take a 10 microgram supplement of Vitamin D daily for the duration of your pregnancy.

Foods to avoid eating in pregnancy.

Most foods and drinks are safe to have during pregnancy. But there are some things you should be careful with or avoid. This link will take you to the NHS website that will give you the most up to date information.

Vaccines in pregnancy

Seasonal flu vaccine

All pregnant women are offered seasonal flu vaccination, as they are at increased risk of severe illness if they get flu.

The seasonal flu vaccine can be given safely during any stage of pregnancy. At Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust we offer the flu vaccine in our maternity outpatient department on B Level, Monday to Friday 9am to 4pm (not bank holidays).

The Flu season is normally from the end of September to the end of February.

Whooping cough vaccine

Pregnant women can help protect their babies by getting vaccinated against whooping cough (pertussis). Having the vaccination helps protect your baby from catching whooping cough in the first few weeks after they're born, as they will get some of the immunity from you.

The best time to have the whooping cough vaccine is between 20 weeks (after your scan) and 32 weeks. But if for any reason you miss having the vaccine, you can still have it up until you go into labour. You can have the vaccine in the maternity outpatient department after your anomaly scan.

Click here to read some FAQs about whooping cough vaccination in pregnancy.

 

Useful links

 

 

 

 

Opening hours

Due to COVID-19, visiting restrictions are in place.

Please click here to see the most up to date guidance.

Where to find us

Lift area 2 at QA Hospital.

Contact information

Located on B level at QA Hospital.

Ward B5 - 02392 286000 ext 3284

Ward B6 - 02392 286000 ext 4552

Ward B7 - 02392 286000 ext 4544

Ward B8 - 02392 286000 ext 4500

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Queen Alexandra Hospital,
Cosham,
Portsmouth,
PO6 3LY

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