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The hard work and dedication of its hospital volunteers was celebrated on 18 February 2013 when around 140 people came together for a celebration of the work done by the volunteers.

Hosted by Mark Nellthorp, a non-executive director for the Trust, the event thanked our volunteers for their amazing contributions.

Our volunteer community continues to grow with new volunteers from local colleges, the newly retired and some local unemployed people looking to develop their skills. Many have been patients and choose to offer something in return. Others are looking for future career opportunities and many recently retired looking for something to occupy their new found time.

Four people were awarded Volunteer of the Year Awards:

Beryl Neate and Jane Brightwell – Co-facilitators of the Macmillan Carers Support Group

Dave Gladders – Hepatitis C Support Group

Margot Berry – Oncology and Rheumatology

Hospital volunteers

In addition 11 were highly commended:

Sonia King and Jayne Harrison – Pre-operative assessment clinic

Yvonne Tatlow – Hospital Food Group and meal time volunteer

Anne Davis – Macmillan Centre Self Management Facilitator

Margaret Sheldrake – Hospital Guide and Learning and Development Team

Helen Bernstein – Children’s Unit

Marie Tucker – Maternity Unit Outpatient Support and occasional actor

Theresa Madzingira – Diabetes Unit

Pamela Rodgers – Respiratory Unit

Mervyn Bell – Ophthalmology Department

Alan Rothwell – Cardiac Investigations Unit

 

We want to thank everyone for the time they have dedicated to the hospital.

So what do people say about our volunteers?

“They have shown a great commitment to their role, extending their regular volunteering roles to ensure the smooth running of the group. They make a real difference to carers at a very difficult time.”

“His positive outlook and creative approaches are inspiring for patients and clinicians alike.”

“She has worked tirelessly to help patients and the public. She sees things that need to be done and simply gets on and does them.”

“She makes a real difference to the reputation and atmosphere, supporting patients and families in a caring and sensitive manner.”

“The day that she supports us is our most challenging. Her calm and welcoming manner is appreciated by staff and patients alike.”

“He is a stalwart of the department coming in each week without fail to help. He only occasionally misses when his wife makes him take a holiday!”

“He is a valuable asset to my department and is a great ambassador for the Trust.”

“Nothing is too much trouble for her. She will turn her hand to anything from making the patient’s tea or escorting them to other departments. This is all done with her usual cheery disposition.”

“Despite many changes in the volunteer workforce, she has remained a constant. I have found her to be an excellent advocate and someone who has championed the role.”

“She volunteers in the outpatient areas assisting in tasks which release the qualified staff to care. She undertakes her role with a positive and cheery attitude and nothing is ever too much trouble.”

“She is always cheerful, reliable and has established herself as an integral part of the team. We would be lost without her!”

“Many patients have expressed their gratitude for the input they have received and how at ease she has made them feel.”

“She is a real pleasure to have around. She comes in a couple of days a week and is so capable her list of tasks continues to grow. What an absolute star.”

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